Common garden skink

Common garden skink

Posted by

Common garden skink

The common garden skink or pale-flecked garden sunskink (Lampropholis guichenoti) is a species of small common skink endemic to Australia.

Scientific classification

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Reptilia
  • Order: Squamata
  • Family: Scincidae
  • Genus: Lampropholis
  • Species: L. guichenoti
  • Binomial name: Lampropholis guichenoti

Description

Lampropholis guichenoti can grow to a maximum of 14 cm, but rarely exceeds 9 cm. According to statistics, the average common garden skink lives up to 2–3 years.

The garden skink usually has a browny black colour and sometimes may appear a dark shade of red when bathing in the sun. The lighter their colour the more energetic they are. They have small sharp teeth which easily slice through smaller prey. Even wild individuals are very docile, and rarely bite humans when touched or picked up.

Habitat

Skinks are often seen under leaves, in long grass and under rocks so that they can watch their prey, they also love hiding in logs where their big predators can’t get them.

As all reptiles are cold blooded, you may see them on top of rocks or paths in the morning trying to warm their blood. Skinks enjoy large areas with a lot of leaves and soft dirt. You normally find them around hot and dusty areas that have lots of trees and stumps.

Sex

The female pale-flecked garden sunskink has a yellowish, almost orange tinge to her underside, however the males have a light grey tinge to their underside. Females are often bigger than the males in size.

Diet

Garden skins feed on large invertebrates, including pulses, moths, slaters, walnuts, flies, grubs and caterpillars, grasshoppers, poisonous cockroaches, ears, slugs, pails, small spiders, ladybittels, ants and many other small insects. Makes helpful.

The animals around the garden can also feed on fruits and vegetables, but vegetables are cooked for skink so that they can eat. Skins especially love bananas and strawberries (no citrus fruits). Garden skinks hunt only when their hunting depends solely on movement. When hunting is done, skinks either hide or wait for prey or actively pursue it (this depends on how hungry it is). Once they have caught their prey, then shake them up sharply to kill it before it is completely swallowed. Once they have taken one meal, they begin actively hunting with their new energy for a little while. Skins require only one hunting item for 4 or 5 days, but, etiquette is good, thus making it the ideal pet for young children. They eat worms if you land out with salt water because the worm in the soil is very high for them.

Facts

  • The female Pale Flecked Garden Sunskink has a yellow, almost orange tinge to her underside, however the males have a light grey tinge to their underside.
  • They have no prominent teeth to harm larger predators, yet for smaller prey hold small, sharp teeth which can easily slice.
  • Garden skinks feed on larger invertebrates, including crickets, moths, slaters, earthworms, flies, grubs and caterpillars, grasshoppers, cockroaches, earwigs, slugs, small spiders, ladybirds, ants and many other small insects.
  • When hunting, the skinks will either hide and wait for prey to come by or actively pursue it (this depends on how hungry they are). Once they have caught their prey, they shake it around vigorously to kill it before swallowing it whole.
  • Skinks are often seen under leaves, in long grass and under rocks so that they can watch their prey, they also love hiding in logs where their big predators can’t get them.

Common garden skink images

Common garden skink

Common garden skink

Common garden skink

Also more:

Reference site:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *