Sungaya

Sungaya inexpectata

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Sungaya inexpectata

Sungaya inexpectata is a species of stick insect. Its common name is the sunny stick insect, derived from the less commonly used sungay stick insect. It is a species in the order of the stick insects Phasmatodea and the only member of the genus Sungaya. The genus name refers to the locality of the holotype, i.e. the region where the insect was first identified. The species name is derived from the Latin as “inexpectatus” and means “unexpected”.

There are more than 3,000 different species of stick insect in the world, with more being thought to have not yet been discovered. Stick insects can range in size from just 3 cm to 30 cm in length.

Stick insects have long, cylindrical bodies, that are stick-like in both shape and colour. Some stick insect species however have more flattened bodies which make them look more like leaves than sticks.

Scientific classification

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Arthropoda
  • Class: Insecta
  • Order: Phasmatodea
  • Superfamily: Bacilloidea
  • Family: Heteropterygidae
  • Genus: Sungaya
  • Species: S. inexpectata
  • Binomial name: Sungaya inexpectata

Foods

This species will usually eat: Bramble, Hawthorn, Chestnut, Raspberry, English ivy, Beech.

Discovery

Oliver Zompro collected the first specimen of this species, a nymph, on 8 September 1995 in Baranggay Sungay in the province of Batangas-associated township Talisayon on the Philippine island of Luzon. She died a short time later due to a failed molting during transport.

On October 7, 1995, he was almost at the same location where he collected an adult female, which he described in 1996 as the holotype of the species, and which is currently located at the Zoological Museum at the University of Kiel. Zompro discovered more females in 1999 near the Taal Lake.

Habitat

Their natural range is very broad; they occur at high and low altitudes, in temperate and tropical temperatures and in dry or wet conditions. Stick insects generally live in trees and bushes, but some species live entirely on grassland. Stick insects are nocturnal animals, meaning the are only active at night.

Facts

  • Shed and regenerate their limbs to escape attacks by predators
  • Reproduce parthenogenetically, without the need for males
  • Only look like sticks, they act like them, too
  • Eggs resemble seeds scattered about the forest floor
  • Stick insects don’t bite, but they aren’t defenceless

Behavior

Stick insects occur on all continents except Antarctica. Their natural range is very broad; they occur at high and low altitudes, in temperate and tropical temperatures and in dry or wet conditions. Stick insects generally live in trees and bushes, but some species live entirely on grassland.

Sungaya inexpectata images

Sungaya

Sungaya inexpectata

Sungaya inexpectata

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