Atlantic cod

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Content Overview of Atlantic cod

History of Atlantic cod

The Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) is a benthopelagic fish of the family Gadidae, widely consumed by humans. It is also commercially known as cod or codling. The Atlantic cod is closely tied to the history of Maritime Canada. Once European explorers first arrived. Over time, the cod populations declined, and in 1992, a complete ban on cod fishing was declared, following the collapse of the Canadian east coast cod fishery.

Cod has a typical chin barbel, a kind of beard, which they use to {search|to look|to go looking} for food in the sea floor. These fish are sometimes referred to as the vacuum cleaners of the sea bottom because they eat virtually everything. you usually find them close to the bottom, but they also swim higher up in the water column. Young cod is called codling.

Atlantic cod come in a variety of colors, including grey, green, red and brown. they have a pale line along the side of their body, called a lateral line. Gadus morhua also have a single whisker-like barbel on their chin.

Distribution and habitat

Gadus morhua are marine benthopelagic fish, living near the bottom and in the open ocean. These fish are located in a temperate climate with a range in temperature from 0 to 20 degrees Celsius. Geographically the majority of the population lies within a latitude of 80 to 35 degrees north (Frimodt 1995).

The areas of highest abundance are in Canadian waters and include the eastern coast of Labrador south of Cape Harrison, off eastern Newfoundland, the Flemish Cap, the Grand Bank, the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and the Scotian Shelf.

The Atlantic cod ranges from Greenland to North Carolina. Gadus morhua prefer waters close to the ocean bottom. they are most commonly found relatively shallow waters less than 500 feet deep.

Atlantic cod characteristics

Scientific Name: Gadus morhua
Lifespan: 16 – 25 years
Origin: North Atlantic
Common Names: Atlantic cod
Size: up to 150cm(59 inches)
PH: 3-10 (7cm)
Temperature: 0 to 20 degrees
Water Hardness: 10° to 20° DH,
Fish type:
Aquarium Size: 10 gallons or larger.
Tank Mates: Many, given their peaceful nature.
Gender:

Lifecycle of Atlantic cod

Atlantic cod Temperament / Behavior

Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua (Linnaeus, 1758), are one of the most popular food fishes in the western world. atlantic cod are longer-lived and larger than their Pacific counterpart external link. seasonal migrations of Atlantic cod are attributed to water temperature, food supply, and spawning grounds. atlantic cod move as a group and tend to follow warmer water currents during these times. although they prefer a habitat in which water temperature ranges from 2 to 11 degrees Celsius, some populations have been found as low as -1.5 degrees Celsius. Cod are able to withstand such cold temperatures by producing plasma antifreeze proteins which prevent their blood from forming ice crystals.

Dominance hierarchies created by spawning males may result from differences in body size and aggressive interactions. Larger fish are often observed playing a dominant role over smaller fish.

Certain populations seem to have leaders (the largest size class) which guide the mass of fish through the migration route. it is also speculated that the youngest fish actually learn the migration path from the older fish. Changes in fish stocks (e.g. reduction of older fish) might result in different migration paths being created.

How to take care?

Feeding for Atlantic cod

Atlantic cod are omnivorous, feeding at dawn or dusk on a variety of invertebrates and fish. they are top predators and used to dominate the ecosystem of the north Atlantic Ocean. but overfishing has caused huge changes in this ecosystem, resulting in an expansion of cod prey such as urchins (which have since been overfished), lobsters and shrimp, leading to a “system out of balance.”

Prior to its recent population decline, the adult Atlantic cod were top-tier predators in the northwest Atlantic, along with haddock, flounder, and hake, feeding upon smaller prey such as herring, capelin, shrimp, and snow crab. Larval cod feed on krill, larval copepods, and other small crustaceans and fish.

Atlantic cod practice some cannibalism. in the southern north sea, 1–2% (by weight) of stomach contents for cod larger than 10 cm consisted of juvenile cod. in the northern north sea, cannibalism was higher, at 10%. other reports of cannibalism have estimated as high as 56 of the diet consists of juvenile cod.

Health and Diseases:

The increased target cultivation of cod codfish has brought revived attention to the diseases of this species, and to the treatment and prevention of those diseases. There area unit several reports on cod diseases, chiefly on wild stocks, however a side-effect of domestication of a ‘new’ species is that the inescapable multiplied target its diseases, their prevention and treatment. The parasites of cod were reviewed by Hemmingsen & MacKenzie (2001). This subject is so not enclosed for this review. the aim of the current paper is to review the infectious agent and microorganism diseases of cod, further because of the gift information on the pharmacological medicine of medicine agents, treatment and prevention.

Best food for Atlantic cod fish :

The diet of Atlantic cod is best described as opportunistic because they feed on anything they are capable of capturing. at all life stages, however, they eat primarily other animals. Juveniles feed on shrimp and other small crustaceans. Adult Atlantic cod consume squid, mussels, clams, tunicates, comb jellies, brittle stars, sand dollars, sea cucumbers, and polychaetes, and are also cannibalistic.

Prior to its recent population decline, the adult Atlantic cod were top-tier predators in the northwest Atlantic, along with haddock, flounder, and hake, feeding upon smaller prey such as herring, capelin, shrimp, and snow crab. Larval cod feed on krill, larval copepods, and other small crustaceans and fish.

Atlantic cod Fish for sale

Atlantic cod Fish Price

Cod Fish box price

Photo of Atlantic cod fish

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Read Also : Tench Fish

Reference : Wikipedia

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