Crested gecko

Crested Gecko Species: Guide for Care

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Crested Gecko

The Crested Gecko is also recognized as the New Caledonian Gecko or Eyelash Gecko due to its pronounced ridges that mimic eyelashes. This arboreal lizard was once believed to be obsolete, but it wasn’t till the early 1990’s that a breeding group was imported inside the United States.

Crested Geckos are effortless to preserve and breed suddenly in captivity. In addition, particular breeding has introduced various colors, patterns, and markings, making this one of the most famous reptiles possible today.

Content overview

History

Characteristics

Behavior and Temperament

Housing the Crested Gecko

Heat

Light

Humidity

Substrate

Food and Water

Health Problems

Choosing Your Crested Gecko

Advantages and Disadvantages

History

The crested gecko or eyelash gecko is a variety of geckos belonging to southern New Caledonia. In 1866, the crested gecko was represented by a French zoologist named Alphone Guichenot. This variety was considered unknown until it was rediscovered in 1994 throughout an expedition directed by Robert Seipp.

After their original information, they were not viewed again and were considered extinct. Then, over 100 years later, they were “rediscovered” after a tropical storm. They are originated on the principal island, Grand Terre, in the southern division and the Isle of Pines.

Characteristics

The crested gecko has hair-like projections found beyond the eyes, resembling eyelashes. It has a wedge-shaped head and a crest that runs from the eye to the tail. Crested geckos do not have eyelids, and so they utilize their long tongues to moisten their eyes and eliminate debris.

Class: Reptiles

Common Names: Crested gecko, New Caledonian crested gecko, eyelash gecko

Family: Correlophus

Scientific Name: Rhacodactylus ciliatus

Species: C. ciliatus

Length: 8 to 10 inches

Life Expectancy: 10 to 20 years

Wild Diet: Soft, ripe/overripe fruit items as well as insects

Behavior and Temperament

Crested geckos are crepuscular; they mature operating during dawn and dusk. Therefore, they will be numerous effective at these times. However, at different times and mainly throughout the day, your crested gecko will be hiding or sleeping.

Sometimes you will discover crested geckos burrowing or digging in the substrate; this is typical behavior. However, seldom do they want to find a bit of a “cool place” to go for a while. It also could be signs that a female is watching to lay eggs!

Crested geckos have no eyelids, so you’ll recognize them moistening their eyes by constantly licking them with their tongues. They can also climb on soft surfaces with ease. They are lovely vocal, so don’t be shocked if you hear your gecko “communicating” to you! They are wonderful jumpers!

Housing the Crested Gecko

A minimum of a 20-gallon high terrarium is adequate for an adult, but a bigger tank is more reliable. Crested geckos are arboreal, robust, and require much vertical space for climbing, so a tall tank is favored. Two to three crested geckos can be housed in a tall 29-gallon terrarium.

Crested geckos require a place to climb, giving a mix of branches, driftwood, cork bark, bamboo, and vines at various heights and adjustments. Add a type of silk or sturdy alive plants as they will hide in the plants for shelter.

Every day, you will require eliminating all uneaten food and place cleaned to eliminate feces. In addition, wipe the entire terrarium and its accessories at least once a month utilizing reptile-safe disinfectants.

Heat

It is essential to hold your crested gecko within 60 & 80 degrees Fahrenheit (16-27 C) without dramatic swings. These are the secure minimum and maximum ranges. Going lower temperature inside the 50s at night is protected as long as they are not retained at this temperature.

Among 70 and 80 degrees is the favored range of temperature for night and day. Heat is essential to all reptiles, as they are ectothermic or “cold blooded.” Their blood isn’t icy, but it does mean that they need outside heat to support digestion.

Light

No unique lights are needed with these geckos, but you must provide them with some light if you have a realistic plan. Also, even CFL bulbs can produce heat, so be assured to observe heat when using lights.

You may prefer to give different UVB lights for your crested geckos, but they are not required. There is specialization bulbs designed either for night-time heating or night viewing. These are either the red bulbs or blue color bulbs to be held on all night long. Crested geckos may view these wavelengths of light, and it may prevent their usual nocturnal behaviors.

Humidity

The overall guideline is to give a dry time mid-day at about 55% with a high of 90-100% right after sprinkling. The level will drop to the low end after about 12 hours with sufficient ventilation. So spend in a proper digital hygrometer if you want, or hold an eye on tank situations.

Most terrarium-style tanks have a mesh cover at the peak for purpose; it supports the air cycle and bypasses stagnation. It is necessary to have water ready to keep the tank from sharp swings in humidity. However, it is suggested the tank dry out about 55% throughout the day, when lights are on, on an outstanding moisture cycle.

Substrate

Crested geckos use most of their time above ground so that various substrates can be used. For easy maintenance ideas, the reptile carpet is attractive and clean. For a more natural look, a peat-moss-based soil mix that doesn’t include perlite will work properly.

Crested geckos feel relaxed resting in foliage and wish to climb on wood. Proper landscape materials include cork bark sections for vertical and ground-level shelters and climbing sections. In addition, dried wood branches angled beyond the length of a vivarium give resting and activity areas.

Artificial plants mixed with wood and bark will produce the security crested geckos required to rest in the open and add a decorative ingredient to the display.

Food and Water

Crested Gecko’s Diet has played a vital function in producing these among the most famous lizards kept as pets because it eliminates the requirement to feed live insects. Crested geckos flourish when given this diet completely, tested with thousands of geckos for longer than 10 years.

The diet is combined with two parts water and gave in shallow dishes three times a week as many as these geckos will eat at a feeding. In addition to fruit, crested geckos enjoy insects, and few hobbyists prefer to give these as either a primary diet or a different diet.

Crickets now sold in the pet sales are the most suitable choice, and you should choose a size where the length of cricket matches the width of the head. They should be allowed three times a week as a primary diet or once a week as a feast/supplement to the Crested Gecko Diet.

Water should regularly be available for crested geckos in a simple water dish. These geckos also need a relevant humidity of at least 50 percent and optionally 70 percent.

Health Problems

One common serious and general affliction that a crested gecko can experience is a metabolic bone disease. Crested geckos require calcium in their diet, and if they don’t get sufficient calcium and vitamin D, it can generate a host of spine and limb deformities.

Impaction is another severe and all too prevalent health problem for crested geckos. Eating and ingesting substrate is the progressive condition of impaction. Feeding your gecko a far too big meal to be gobbled can also guide to impaction.

Prolepses, parasites, especially wild-caught somebody, and burns from heat rocks or lamps are also critical problems allowing these geckos.

Choosing Your Crested Gecko

When considering how to prefer a crested gecko, various factors are necessary. The gecko’s health is most significant, and identifying what to see for in a healthy individual requires learning about the varieties.

Also essential is obtaining your crested gecko from a distinguished dealer or breeder. When you have provided yourself with this knowledge, you will be assured of your selection.

The crested gecko also grows further vibrant in color at night. However, they may appear slightly dull in bloom during the day and become “fired up” at night. Therefore, you may require recognizing your potential new pet at various times of day to get a more excellent idea of its coloring.

Advantages and Disadvantages

Advantages of owning a male crested gecko:

  • You won’t need to think about carrying and laying eggs when owning a male crested gecko. That implies no nesting site or worrying regarding egg-binding.
  • Male crested geckos serve to live a bit longer than females.
  • Males are generally sold for cheaper than females.

Disadvantages of owning a male crested gecko:

  • You won’t be capable of housing some males together. But you will be capable of accommodating one male and up to 5 female.
  • Males can grow territorial during a breeding season.
  • Male crested geckos are inclined to prolapse.

Feature Image Source By: Image by vujicivana from Pixabay

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