Domestic Pig

Domestic Pig

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The domestic pig originates from the Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa). We have sequenced mitochondrial DNA and nuclear genes from wild and domestic pigs from Asia and Europe. Clear evidence was obtained for domestication to have happened separately from wild boar subspecies in Europe and Asia.

Since the separation of the ancestral forms, the difference was evaluated at around 500,000 years, well before domestication about 9,000 years ago. Historical records designate that Asian pigs were introduced into Europe throughout the 18th and early 19th centuries.

Content overview

Description

Characteristics

Appearance

Behavior

Habitat

Diet

Care

Conservation

Interesting Facts

Description

The domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus or only Sus domesticus) is often called swine, hog, or pig when other pigs do not recognize it. It is an omnivorous, domesticated even-toed ungulate. It is differently acknowledged as a subspecies of the Eurasian boar or a different species. A group of pigs is called a passel, a team, or a sounder.

The size and weight of domestic pigs extensively depend on their breed. Compared to other artiodactyls, a pig’s head is comparatively long and pointed. Most even-toed ungulates are herbivorous, but domestic pigs are omnivores, like their wild relative. For example, pigs “grunt” and make “snorting” sounds.

Characteristics

Domestic Pig Facts

  • Main Prey: Roots, Seeds, Leaves
  • Fun Fact: The pig was among the first animals to be domesticated.
  • Habitat: Forests and grassland
  • Diet: Omnivore
  • Average Litter Size: 7
  • Lifestyle: Herd
  • Favorite Food: Roots
  • Type: Mammal
  • Common Name: Domestic Pig

Physical Characteristics

  • Colour: Brown, Grey, Black, White, Pink
  • Skin Type: Hair
  • Top Speed: 11 mph
  • Lifespan: 8-15 years
  • Length: 0.9 to 1.8 m (2 ft 11 in to 5 ft 11 in)
  • Weight: 30-350kg (66-770lbs)

Scientific classification

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Mammalia
  • Order: Artiodactyla
  • Family: Suidae
  • Genus: Sus
  • Species: S. scrofa
  • Subspecies: S. s. domesticus

Appearance

The domestic pig typically has a broad head with a long snout strengthened by a special prenasal bone and a cartilage disk at the tip. The bill digs into the soil to obtain food and is a very acute sense organ. The dental formula of adult pigs is an entirety of 44 teeth. The rear teeth are adjusted for crushing. In the male, the canine teeth can appear as tusks, which develop continuously and are sharpened by being ground against each other.

Most domestic pigs have a bristled, sparse hair, including their skin, although woolly-coated breeds such as the Mangalitsa exist. Four hoofed toes are on each foot, with the two larger central toes bearing most of the weight, but the outer two are also utilized in soft ground. Domestic pigs have tiny lungs about their body size and are more susceptible to fatal bronchitis and pneumonia than other domesticated animals.

Behavior

In numerous ways, their behavior seems to be intermediate to that of other artiodactyls and carnivores. Domestic pigs seek out other pigs’ company and usually huddle to keep physical contact, although they do not normally form large herds. They typically live in about 8–10 adult sows, some young people, and some single males.

Because of their relative lack of sweat glands, pigs frequently constrain their body temperature managing behavioral thermoregulation. Wallowing, which regularly consists of coating the body with mud, is commonly exhibited by pigs. They do not submerge entirely under the ground but vary the depth and duration of wallowing depending on environmental circumstances.

Habitat

Different species in this group use several varieties of habitats. A few of the diverse ecosystems you can discover these creatures include rainforests, scrubby secondary forests, mangroves, swamps, grasslands, and more numerous. Some live in a few specific habitat standards, while others specialize in a selective habitat.

Domestic Pigs exist in a wide diversity of habitats. They maintain pastures and farmland and thrive in wooded regions, scrub forests, and just regarding any habitat with sufficient water to drink.

Diet

These creatures have greedy feeding habits. They normally discover their food underground by managing their acute understanding of smell. Some popular food items include roots, tubers, nuts, fruits, berries, seeds, insects, grubs, and more. However, some species feed more heavily on carrion and small mammals and hunt young lambs, deer fawns, or calves.

Pigs, boars, and hogs are omnivores and will consume simply about anything. Wild boars eat roots, fruit, rodents, and small reptiles, National Geographic reported. Domestic pigs and hogs are supplied supplies that are produced from corn, wheat, soy, or barley.

Care

Male and female swine that have not been de-sexed may express unwanted aggressive behavior and are inclined to produce serious health issues. Regular trimming of the hooves is required; claws left untreated conditions extreme pain in the pig, have malformations in bone structure and make them more susceptible to fungal growth between crevices of the hoof or between the foot or between the cracks in a split hoof.

Male pigs can become large, sharp tusks that may continue growing for years, particularly when left unchanged. Therefore, domestic owners may wish to keep their pigs’ tusks trimmed back or have them removed entirely.

Conservation

The conservation status of these breeds of hogs is Not Listed on the IUCN red list. This is because their world population is under no major threat.

Interesting Facts

Here are some interesting facts about Domestic pigs.

  • Baby Pigs are called ‘piglets’.
  • Pigs are intelligent animals.
  • People use pigs for meat, such as Bacon, Pork, and ham.
  • A pig’s snout is utilized to search and root for food.
  • They are incredibly social creatures that form connections with pigs and people.
  • They love lying down in close contact with each other.
  • Pigs are mostly peace-loving animals, and the only time you might observe any aggressive behavior is if a mother pig considers her babies are being threatened.
  • Pigs have an incredible sense of smell.
  • Their snouts have a large round disk that is composed of cartilage at the very end.
  • It is attached with muscles that allow it to move to have the strength to root around in the ground.

Feature Image Source By: Image by Herbert Aust from Pixabay

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