Earless monitor lizard species

Earless Monitor Lizard

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Earless Monitor Lizards (Lanthanotus borneensis) is a family of Squamata. The genus name Lanthanotus implies “hidden ear,” and the species name borneensis relates to its home island of Borneo. It is the unique living species in the family Lanthanotidae, associated to the true monitor lizards. They are carnivores. They have sexual reproduction.

Earless Monitor Lizards has been admitted a vicious animal like different members of the Toxicofera group, including Heloderma. Reproduction is oviparous and dioecious. They rely on running to move throughout.

Content overview

Description

Characteristics

Appearance

Behavior

Habitat

Diet

Conservation

Facts

Description

The earless monitor lizard was described in 1878 by Franz Steindachner. The genus name Lanthanotus indicates “hidden ear”, and the species name borneensis refers to its home island of Borneo. A most recent genetic confirmation has affirmed that the nearest relative of the earless monitor lizard is Varanidae.

Species: L. borneensis

Genus: Lanthanotus; Steindachner, 1878

Family: Lanthanotidae; Steindachner, 1877

Characteristics

Monitor Lizard Facts

  • Main Prey: Rodents, Snakes, Lizards
  • Fun Fact: Some species are thought to carry a weak venom!
  • Habitat: River banks and coastal forests
  • Diet: Carnivore
  • Average Litter Size: 10
  • Lifestyle: Solitary
  • Favorite Food: Rodents
  • Type: Reptile

Physical Characteristics

  • Colour: Brown, Grey, Tan, Green
  • Skin Type: Scales
  • Top Speed: 28 mph
  • Lifespan: 8-30 years
  • Length: about 40 cm
  • Weight: 1-166kg (2.2-366lbs)

Scientific classification

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Reptilia
  • Order: Squamata
  • Superfamily: Varanoidea
  • Family: Lanthanotidae
  • Genus: Lanthanotus
  • Species: L. borneensis

Appearance

Earless monitor lizards have a cylindrical body, long neck, short limbs, long sharp claws, small eyes, semitransparent lower eyelids, and six longitudinal rows of heavily keeled scales. Despite the name, they can listen, although they need a tympanum, an ear-opening, and additional externally visible ears symptom.

The upper parts are orangish-brown, and the bottom is mottled dark brown and whitish, pale yellowish, ochre, or rusty. The tail is prehensile, and if it is lost, it is not reconstructed. The skin is scattered rarely, probably less than once a year. There are both descriptions of the skin shedding in one piece or smaller pieces. They can make a gentle, squeaky vocalization.

Behavior

Earless monitor lizards are commonly strictly nocturnal animals, although exceptionally daytime measurements in the open have been announced. The day is normally spent near water in caves that can be up to 30 cm long or under logs, rocks or vegetation. They are commonly pretty inactive and not quick but can make surprisingly fast spurts when startled and rapidly catch prey items placed in front of them.

They seldom remain virtually immobile underwater for hours in captivity, periodically lifting the nose beyond the water’s surface to breathe. When underwater, the semitransparent lower eyelids are commonly closed, covering the eyes. It has been considered that the prehensile tail is wrapped around stones, roots, and other things underwater to evade being swept along throughout floods.

Habitat

The Earless Monitor Lizard Lanthanotus borneensis is endemic to the Southeast Asian island of Borneo and has been defined as the Holy Grail of herpetology. However, due to its subterranean habits and stopped spreading in north-western Borneo, the species inhabits essentially unknown to the outside world.

These are typically in rainforests, but they are also discovered in streams passing through degraded habitats such as agricultural land, mature fruit tree gardens, and palm oil plantations. In addition, they reportedly may happen in rice paddies.

Diet

They typically feed on earthworms, crustaceans, and fish. In captivity, they will consume whole and whole fish, earthworms, squid, shrimp, tadpoles, the yolk of green sea turtle eggs, pieces of pig and chicken liver, baby mice, and mussels but refuse to take bird eggs and legs of a frog.

Adults typically consume once or twice per week in captivity but seldom begin longer periods where they do not feed. Especially for a lizard, they can consume prey while submerged underwater. They resemble to be capable of doing this by drinking water from their nostrils, related to turtles.

Conservation

The IUCN has not evaluated the earless monitor lizard, but it possibly qualifies as vulnerable or endangered. The species is ordinarily recognized very rare, but it is undoubtedly overlooked, and as recently as 1999, the only published records were from Sarawak. Evidence from Kalimantan only appeared later. Thus, in some regions, locals are uninformed of its presence or consider it rare, but it may be normal in others. Although, the earless monitor lizard is only recognized for an individual from a relatively small number of sites.

Facts

Here are some interesting facts about Earless Monitor Lizard species.

  • Earless Monitor lizards are recognized as the most intelligent of all and some of the most intelligent lizards in common.
  • Monitors do not blink, and they have very good vision. Scientists have recognized monitors watching planes in the sky.
  • Unlike many other reptiles, several monitor lizards have great metabolisms and burn energy-like creatures.
  • As pets, monitors have been recognized, seeking human attention and wanting to play.
  • Monitors are alert and experienced predators.

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