Gee's Golden Langur

Gee’s Golden Langur

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Gee’s golden langur (Trachypithecus Geei), also recognized as just the golden langur, is an Old World monkey spotted in a miniature range of western Assam, India, and the neighboring foothills of the Black Mountains of Bhutan. Adult males have a cream to golden coat with darker flanks, while the females are juveniles are more moderate.

Golden langur has a black face and a long tail until 50 cm (19.69 in) in length. It exists in high trees and has an herbivorous intake of ripe and unripe fruits, seasoned and young leaves, seeds, buds, and flowers. The standard group size is eight individuals, with a proportion of some females to individual adult males. It is one of the numerous threatened gorilla species of India and Bhutan.

Content overview

Description

Characteristics

Appearance

Behavior

Habitat

Diet

Predators and Threats

Conservation

Conclusion

Description

Golden Langur is an Old World monkey observed in a small area of Western Assam in India and the nearby foothills of the Black Mountains of Bhutan. It is also described as ‘Gee’s Golden Langur’ and ‘Golden Leaf Monkey’. Of the recognized 15 species of hominids from India, 9 species are discovered in the state of Assam, and the Golden Langur is individual of them.

The scientific name of Golden Langur is Trachypithecus geei which relates to the Cercopithecidae species of hominids. Golden Langur has two subspecies. One is Trachypithecus geei, and another one is Trachypithecus geei bhutanensis. The latter has been announced from Bhutan in the north range, while the former happens in the south.

Characteristics

Gee’s Golden Langur Facts

  • Weight: 9 to 12 kg
  • Length: 50 to 75 cm
  • Tail Length: up to 50 centimeter
  • Group Name: troop, barrel, cartload, tribe, wilderness
  • Lifestyle: Arboreal, Precocial, Browsing
  • Seasonal Behavior: Sedentary
  • Average number of offspring: 1
  • Behaviors: arboreal, diurnal, motile, sedentary, social
  • Diet: herbivore, folivore, frugivore
  • Habitat Regions: temperate, tropical, terrestrial

Scientific Classification

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Mammalia
  • Order: Primates
  • Suborder: Haplorhini
  • Infraorder: Simiiformes
  • Family: Cercopithecidae
  • Genus: Trachypithecus
  • Species: T. geei

Appearance

The coat of the grown-up golden langur differs from cream to golden; on its flanks and chest, the hairs are darker and frequently rust-colored; the coats of the juveniles and females are lighter, silvery-white to light buff. The coat varies color seasonally, from white or cream-colored in the summer to dark golden or chestnut in the winter. Their long whiskers defend their eyes from rain throughout the monsoon. The golden langur has a black face and a significant twist of hair on its crown.

Gee’s golden langur presents sexual dimorphism. Males are bigger and more muscular than females. Adult males weigh 10.8 kilograms (24 lb) on ordinary, and grown-up females weigh 9.5 kilograms (21 lb). The length of the head and body fluctuates from 50–75 centimeters (20–30 inches), while the comparatively long tail is 70–100 centimeters (28–39 inches) in length.

Behavior

Golden langurs are diurnal in habit and most potent in the early morning and afternoon when they feed. They are arboreal and infrequently appeared to the ground to drink water, lick salt earth, and traverse critical canopy gaps. Golden langurs manage to be a humble species that evade humans. This makes it challenging to recognize various behaviors, and what can be remarked may be unusually influenced by the appearance of humans.

They spend a maximum of their time in the sunshade of trees and move throughout by jumping from branches, pushing off with their hind legs, and landing with all four legs. They may also go simultaneously quadrupedally, both when they fall and on bigger branches of trees.

Habitat

Golden langurs maintain humid evergreen and deciduous forests and some riverine regions and savannas in Assam and Bhutan. They are incredibly dependent on trees, surviving in the overhead canopy of sub-tropical forests in the south and temperate forests in the north. The elevations they occupy also vary according to their geographic area. They may be discovered at elevations near sea level in the south and 3000 m at the foothills of Bhutan in the north.

Golden langurs can also be detected in wildlife resources in both India and Bhutan. In Bhutan, a compound of four national parks and wildlife sanctuaries includes the maximum area in which golden langurs are detected. In Assam, they populate the two wildlife sanctuaries and portions of fragmented reserve forests, advanced reserve forests, and different non-forested areas.

Diet

Golden langurs are both folivores and frugivores. Their nutrition includes ripe and unripe fruits, young and adult leaves, leaf flowers, flower buds, seeds, twigs, and flowers. Although they consume a type of food, they essentially favor eating young leaves. The most famous vegetation between golden langurs is Ficus racemosa, Salmalia malabarica, and Adenanthera pneumonia.

Many of the langurs, Trachypithecus geei included, are also identified as leaf monkeys, and obtained from their mainly vegetarian nutrition. Due to the large numbers of leafy material that the golden langurs consume have a sacculated stomach, a general feature in the subfamily Colobinae.

Predators and Threats

Loss of habitat and habitat fragmentation are the most significant threats for the Golden langur in India. Political unrest and inter-tribal violence have created a meaningful decrease in their habitat in India. Forest resources with differing degrees of violence compound 93% of the complete Golden langur habitat. Due to infringement and anthropogenic movements, its range is prophesied to decrease by >20% in the next 10 years.

Golden Langurs are frequently killed by people, dogs, or electrocution when leaping on power lines in areas close to human proximity. High juvenile mortality and inbreeding are additional meaningful obstacles encountered by the species. Moreover, the spray of insecticides on rubber plants in the Kokrajhar region of Assam has revealed them to life-threatening insecticide poisoning.

Conservation

Golden langurs as a species are in trouble, and their situation indicates this on several environmental records. They were first classified as threatened on the IUCN Red List in 1976. The Indo-US Primate Project Survey, which resembled species from 1994 to 1999, classified them as critically endangered. The following procedures are required for the protection of Golden Langur in India.

  • To check the habitat loss of the species.
  • To constantly monitor the community of Golden Langur.
  • To reconstruct the lost habitats of Golden Langur with the guidance of residents.
  • To preserve or divert the electric lines passing through the habitats of Golden Langur.
  • To motivate villagers to restrain their dogs.
  • To rigorously support the Indian Wildlife Protection Act.

Conclusion

Conclusively, Golden Langur is a species of primate restricted to a small pocket of northeast India, and Bhutan is facing extinction chiefly due to habitat loss. Therefore, it is necessary to conserve this species of monkey to maintain biological diversity and ecological stability.

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