lowland streaked Tenrec species

Lowland Streaked Tenrec

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The lowland streaked Tenrec appearances sort of like a mix among a shrew and a hedgehog. Its backside is coated with feathers and fur, while its bottom side is covered in soft hair. True to its name, the lowland streaked tenrec has four yellow streaks running the length of its body. It also has a long, pointed snout, big ears small eyes.

The lowland streaked Tenrec is found only on the rainforest-covered eastern elevation of Madagascar. However, it is also discovered in agricultural regions. It eats worms initially but has also been distinguished from eating other small invertebrates.

Content overview

Description

Characteristics

Appearance

Behavior

Habitat

Diet

Population

Conservation

Fun Facts

Description

The Lowland Streaked Tenrec (Hemicentetes semispinosus) is a small tenrec discovered in Madagascar. The species is observed in the tropical lowland rain forest in Madagascar’s northern and eastern divisions. It is active day and night, and its diet is formed up originally of earthworms.

They will seldom prey on different invertebrates as well. Instead, they may be perceived stamping their feet on the ground with their fore-paws, considered to improve earthworm movement for more comfortable foraging. Most tenrecs possess a long snout for poking throughout in the ground to find their food. They are also proficient in eating fruits.

Characteristics

Lowland streaked tenrec Facts

  • Lifespan: 2.6 yrs
  • Weight: 125–280 g (4.4–9.9 oz)
  • Length: up to 172 mm (6.8 in)
  • Diet: Vermivorous
  • Habitat: tropica, terrestrial
  • Behaviors: terricolous,  fossorial, diurnal, motile, sedentary, hibernation, social
  • Gestation period: 58 day
  • Litter size: between 5 and 8

Scientific classification

  • Kingdom: Animalia
  • Phylum: Chordata
  • Class: Mammalia
  • Order: Afrosoricida
  • Suborder: Tenrecomorpha
  • Family: Tenrecidae
  • Genus: Hemicentetes
  • Species: H. semispinosus

Appearance

The lowland streaked tenrec (Hemicentetes semispinosus) relates to the family Tenrecidae in the form Afrosoricida, and further respectively, to the subfamily of the spiny tenrecs Tenrecinae. The average body size for H. semispinosus is 140 mm (5.5 in); however, adults have been designated to grow up to a maximum of 172 mm (6.8 in). Therefore, the bodyweight for adults of this species can vary from 125–280 g (4.4–9.9 oz).

This species has a black spiny pelage with yellow or chestnut-brown stripes that reach the length of the body. In addition, there is a median yellow stripe that goes down the rostrum with one dorsal and two lateral stripes that indicate the length of the body and may assist as a sign to predators.

Behavior

The lowland streaked tenrec is effective both throughout the day and at night. Its diet is formed up essentially of earthworms, but it will seldom prey on different invertebrates. In addition, it can cause severe illness with its strong bite. Another was a streaked tenrec, a medium-sized tenrec with bold black and white coloration. Although these animals are cute, they have barbed feathers that are detachable, like a porcupine feather.

Habitat

The lowland streaked tenrec is only discovered in one country in the entire world. That country is located just off the East coast of Africa and is on an island called Madagascar. More than one species of tenrec live on Madagascar, but lowland streaked tenrecs are only found on the island’s Eastside, which is coated essentially through tropical rainforest.

The Lowland streaked tenrecs (H. semispinosus) are observed in tropical rainforest habitats. The tenrec is classified as island endemic, indicating they are only exposed on one island or a circle of islands. The natural habitat of these species includes the eastern portions of Madagascar, where they exist in the valleys and mid-altitude rainforests.

Diet

The lowland streaked tenrec is working both throughout the day and at night. Its diet is built up essentially of earthworms, but it will seldom prey on different invertebrates. Instead, it may be regarded as stamping its feet on the ground with its fore-paws, an adaptation considered to improve earthworm movement for easier foraging.

Most tenrecs maintain a long snout for poking nearby in the ground to obtain their food. They are also intelligent about eating fruit. While the streaked tenrec does eat earthworms, it appears to affect them. The way it moves them is by their teeth which there would be scratches and pits caused by dirt.

Population

These tenrecs and additional Madagascar animals are numerous at risk of losing their natural habitat due to continuous deforestation. In addition, this species is also hunted for its food. As a result, they are categorized as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

The Lowland streaked Tenrec, according to IUCN, is remarkably widespread during its range. However, no evaluation of its overall population is available. The current population trend for this species is not recognized.

Conservation

Lowland Streaked Tenrec is classified as a species of most minor concern by IUCN due to its widespread distribution, high abundance, and high tolerance to regions with many humans. Hemicentetes semispinosus also happens in various protected reserves and national parks.

Fun Facts of Lowland Streaked Tenrec

Here are some interesting facts about the Lowland Streaked Tenrec.

  • These animals proceed with ‘crunch’ or ‘putt-putt noises when they find a predator. Meanwhile, the long hairs on the predator’s back become stiff and raise and push the victim.
  • The spines of the newborn Lowland tenrecs are missing in Lowland babies, and they start to improve them as soon as possible after birth.
  • The streaked Tenrec is the only creature that follows stridulation. This is when a pet rubs portions of its body synchronically to produce a sound.
  • These animals utilize tongue-clicking to evade intruders, simultaneously with stridulation. Although it is probable they may employ echolocation, this theory has yet to be proven.
  • The crown is made of yellow feathers that are connected to the head of the Lowland-stripped Tenrec. In addition, it will push its opponent with its head-butt if it is threatened.
  • This species is closely related to the highland streaked Tenrec, which lives in the central upland areas of Madagascar.
  • The lowland streaked Tenrec has a more extensive forelimb construction than a related species of common rice tenrec.

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